RISK II

Believe it or not I’d never heard of the board game RISK until I was in my early 20’s. My sister’s boyfriend of the time introduced it to us and I very quickly become addicted to it. In some ways it is a highly simplified version of Warhammer which I was vaguely aware of at the time (and still have never tried playing).

The board game offers up a simplified map of the globe for up to 6 players to battle it out. Each player controls an army and is given a mission card with an objective to complete to win the game. Examples include “Capture Africa and North America” or “Eliminate The Green Player”.

RISK II is Deep Red Games second recreation of this board game for home computers. The first game came out in 1996 with this version arriving four years later in March 2000. Out of the box it offers a very faithful and highly playable recreation of the original board game. The first noticeable bonus of computerisation comes from a worthy roster of A.I. players. Since gathering six humans for a good game has always been a challenge it’s really nice to be able to enjoy a single player match against good computer opponents or mixing some AI unpredictability for a smaller number of human opponents.

But RISK II doesn’t stop there. They actually attempted, and succeeded, to improve upon the original. As well as the classic board game there is now a “Same Time” version of the game that allows players to issue their orders simultaneously (for networked and/or AI players). This is designed to get rid of the slow pace nature of turn base gameplay and reduce the wait between play.

The other addition allows for some optional rule changes including adding some additional countries/connections to reduce the isolation of Australia and South America in particular. There’s also options for auto allocating territories at start and playing capture the capital or domination games instead of using the traditional mission cards. There are also options to alter how the reinforcements are allocated.

All in all Deep Red did a fantastic job of expanding the basic board game and providing a good amount of variety and longevity. And this is all topped by the piece de resistance – Tournament Mode. For single players there’s a 16 level ladder to complete that pits you against ever increasing difficulty in AI opponents. Each level offers a different challenge and regular mix up of the various rules and options available.

5/5

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